Category: Water Facts

How Effective is L.A.’s Conserving Water by the Glass?

City of Los Angeles Emergency Water Conservation Order regulations prohibit restaurants and other public places from serving water to customers unless they specifically ask for a glass of water. So how much of a reduction of water does this city ordinance make and does it have any practical effect on reducing L.A.’s demand?We’ll set up […]

Another Look at Where L.A.’s Water Goes

In another earlier post we saw ‘how much’ water each consumer group in the City of Los Angeles used. Here is a comparative look at where the water goes by percentage. Next we see both where the growth or reductions in share are between 1984 and 2014. Residential share increased from 60.9% to 68% (12 percent change). Commercial was relatively flat at […]

Promise of Backup Water Not Met by DWP

Construction projects going through the city permit process are required to cite how much water demand they will impose on the city’s water supply and whether the city has surplus water supplies to accommodate the project.This information is provided in the EIR (Environmental Impact Report) which is part of the permit package for the project. […]

Would ‘Lose the Lawn’ Solve L.A.’s Water Problem?

Would “Lose the Lawn” solve the City of Los Angeles’s water problem? Throughout the state the crescendo to eliminate residential lawns has grown louder among water boards, agencies and political leaders.  In Los Angeles, a partnership between the Metropolitan Water District and the DWP will even pay residents $3.75 per square foot to convert their lawns ‘drought tolerant’ landscape with arguable curb appeal. “Californians should […]

Where L.A.’s Water Goes

Where does the city’s water go? This chart shows us how much water is used in each of the city’s consumer classes between 1985 and 2014*. Since 2007 single-family residential demand has fallen from 261,530 Af to 208,678 Af. Multi-family residential has fallen from 187,059 to 169,192.  More importantly, Residential per capita has fallen from 106 gallons per capita daily […]

Paper Water is No Small Change

The City of Los Angeles water plans in the past have projected significant amounts of water that later never came. These large sums of water have been used to approve small and large projects going back to 1990. When projects are reviewed by city planners, the figures cited in the city’s water plans are supposed to assure the community that […]