Category: L.A.’s Water Plans

LADWP’s Paper Water Leverages on MWD Supplies

When the LADWP uses paper water, not only does it affect Los Angeles residents, it also impacts utilities and residents outside of the city. ‘Paper water’ is water that “utilities claim they have access to, but is difficult or impossible to access for various reasons”.When the LADWP claims to have access to more city owned domestic water than it really has access […]

First Looks: The LADWP 2015 Draft UWMP – Hiding the Shortage

After spending a few weeks paging through the just released LADWP 2015 Draft Urban Water Management Plan, my immediate conclusion is that the plan is a thinly disguised effort to hide the city’s low water supply levels from the planning process to protect development.This draft, like past UWMP’s, continues to project levels of water in all supply categories that […]

L.A. City Prodded to Grow Without Additional Water

In the most recent Water Board Water Conservation Report showing the state’s June 2015 conservation, LADWP has been revising population figures presumably to keep the Residential gallons per capita daily (R-GPCD) level from getting out of control. They are now estimating monthly population growth and using each months figures to calculate residential water use.I was surprised […]

Dissecting L.A.’s Water Supply – Conservation & Stormwater Capture

With the availability of imported water dramatically falling and local supplies (recycled water and groundwater) not meeting projections, the LADWP had to scramble to come up with ways to develop new supplies or create the perception of sufficient supplies for future growth. Or both. This would require some creative thinking by the department pie charts in […]

Running 9 Cities Out of Water

In a recent article I wrote that California’s biggest danger to water reliability isn’t the lack of dams or groundwater, it was the State’s growth policy that’s forces city’s to build. In its drive to produce housing to meet a desktop analysis that says the state will grow to ~51 million people, the state uses a little known legislative law called RHNA that […]

The WSA – Bringing Imaginary Water to L.A.’s Big Projects

In a previous article I wrote that The Los Angeles Department of Water and Power was confronted with two conflicting demands that dates back to 1990. The department’s conflict is between providing enough water to city residents from a rapidly shrinking water supply that once averaged 680,000 Af/y and is now just over 610,000 Af/y […]

The Paper Water Years – LA’s 1995 – 2000 Water Plans

This is Part IV in a series describing L.A.’s water supply problems and the policies that produced it. In Part III we saw how the city sought to maintain the 1985 baseline of ~175 gallons per capita daily in the 1990 UWMP while population estimates increased. As a result we saw the projected supply in the plan […]

Promise of Backup Water Not Met by DWP

Construction projects going through the city permit process are required to cite how much water demand they will impose on the city’s water supply and whether the city has surplus water supplies to accommodate the project.This information is provided in the EIR (Environmental Impact Report) which is part of the permit package for the project. […]

L.A.’s Drought and Growth are Built on Paper Water

L.A.’s recent drought has been going on far longer than the statewide drought. California’s last drought was declared in 2008 and ended in 2011 and another declared in 2015.  L.A’s drought was declared in 2008 and was never rescinded. So why has L.A.’s drought been so persistent and growing by the day? This brings on another question we should ask […]

L.A.’s First Water Plans – The 1985 & 1990 UWMP

In 1983 the State of California passed the Urban Water Management Plan Act that required water suppliers to provide a water plan every five years. The Urban Water Management Plan (UWMP) is rich in information as it identifies the agencies sources of water (aqueduct, groundwater, imported), amounts of water available from these sources, methods of conveyance, current and future water uses, […]